Wednesday, August 27, 2008

I'm about to go nuts...

While I won't deny that I am definitely a little nutty, I am referring to the real thing. Soon the little farm will be inundated with these little nutty missiles. Already I can hear them hitting the tin roof of our old chicken coop. I love that sound. From the looks of things I will be hearing that song quite a bit in the months to come. I am starting to imagine fat little squirrels scampering among the fallen leaves.


I've always heard that an oak full of acorns means a cold and wet winter. And let me tell you, our oaks are loaded. There are thousands and thousands. Our yard will look like the picture above. I hope this translates to snow. That old saying made me think of all the old wives tales I have heard over the years. Some of them are gospel in my family. I decided to actually do a little research and here is what I learned about the oak and the acorn...


According to Acorn in Folklore and Magick by Eliza Yetter the acorn is the fruit of the oak tree, sacred to the ancient Druids who believed that both the oak and its fruit contained special powers. One of the most popular uses of the acorn is love magic and divination. Lovers in past times would each put an acorn into a bowl of water. If the acorns came together, the lovers would marry. (Don't you wish it were that easy.) However, if the acorns floated apart, the lovers would soon leave each other for someone else. Even more ominous was when an acorn sank because it meant death for the person it represented.

There was also a similar practice of floating the acorn caps in a bowl of water. Each cap contained a small slip of paper with a name on it. The slips of paper were stuck to the inside of the cap with wax. The caps were watched to see where they would float. A cap that floated alone by the side of the bowl meant that the person it was named after would not marry or would soon be parted from his or her lover. A sunken cap meant death. Caps that floated together meant alliances through marriage or business.

Acorns were also placed between the mattress and boxspring of a lover's bed to keep him or her faithful. Placed on windowsills, acorns were believed to protect a home from lightning.
An old British superstition states that if a person carries an acorn in her or his pocket or purse it would prevent old age.


According to Cheryl Dennett at Associated Content, the oak and acorn appear in many legends which still survive today.

An oak limb that has been struck by lightening is said to be able to protect a home from being struck. A few acorns from a branch that has been struck is also good luck and can protect a home. It is thought that standing beneath an oak during a lightening storm offers more protection than other trees.

To get rid of a toothache just hammer a nail into an oak, according to a legend from Cornwall. In Wales it is believed that rubbing a sore with a piece of bark from the oak tree will help them heal. This will only work on a Midsummer Day, however. Hernias and infertility can be cured by simply hugging an oak tree. If you wish to ward off evil spirits, simply stand beneath an oak or wear a few of its leaves (Does this work for PMS- just curious). To get the most powerful healing powers, one should try to find an oak tree planted at a crossroads.


I find this sort of folklore amusing. I am happy to have the big old oaks protecting the little farm. There is something comforting about that- and even better if it brings us long life and keeps the lightening away. I might even display a few like the picture above...a sort of squirrel buffet.

Hope all of you in my neck of the woods are getting some rain this morning. There is a glorious drizzle falling here in Richmond. It's driving me nuts not to be at home....

*Photos of brown acorns courtesy of Google Images.

12 comments:

(Sometimes!) Serendipitous Girl said...

Those trees are gorgeous! And this fall, they'll be so spectacular with the colors and leaves and the cool weather. I get a smile on my face just thinking about fall!

Kim's Treasures said...

Your yard is so beautiful with all those great oaks! I think it's a really cute way to display acorns, while feeding the squirrels, by using a pretty bowl like that. That is a great picture! Hope you enjoy your drizzly day! And watch out for falling acorns...they hurt when they hit your head!
Hugs!
Kim

Living on the Spit said...

I like to paint little faces on acorns with their adorable little berets on their heads. I love your land and I too can not wait for fall and the hope of some snow!!!

My home - My life said...

Those pics are beautiful! Thanks for sharing.

I wish I had more trees (and land for that matter) where I live...

Thrifty Cottage Dreams said...

I'm so glad I have some oak trees! Yes, we have had a lot of rain today and although I'm happy about that, an event that I've been working on is cancelled because of it. Oh well, I'll get over it. I know that we need the rain. Love your acorn pics!

Mrs. B said...

Think of all the neat ways you could use those in fall displays! I love big old oak trees and acorns too. And now I'm off to fill my pockets and purse with them, lol!

Big Hair Envy said...

I love the picture of the acorns in the glass bowl!! I'll have to keep that in mind. The squirrels have plenty at my house, they can spare a few!!!

We were just talking recently about the large volume of acorns predicting a snowy winter! I hate cold weather, but it's more tolerable if there is a little snow!!

I enjoyed the horticultural history lesson. I try to learn something new every day:)

Jean said...

I love oak trees too but I hate raking all those leaves and acorns, which is the price to pay for wonderful trees. Where exactly is Amelia? I live in Roanoke. Jean in Virginia

Wanita said...

Your oak trees are beautiful. I enjoyed your post. I had no idea there was so much folk lore connected with oak trees and acorns.

Blessings to you,
Wanita

traci said...

thanks for the chance to learn a little this morning. very interesting. i am out to find some acorns and put them in my pocket - i liked the anti-aging one.

Linda said...

MY MIL says the same things about the acorns and I have hear from other 'reliable' sources it will be a extra wet and cold winter from the mid Atlantic up through New England and into Canada. Humm -maybe you can burn the acorns for heat?

GeorgiaPeachez said...

Hi there Miss Belladella, I just discovered your blog from looking at my stats. I'm adding you to my google reader roll and will also tell my BFF Beth about your blog. She grew up in Richmond ya know and she will really enjoy reading about your little farm. It's is delightful and I will enjoy reading your blog! My trees are loaded with acorns too and last year was quite the bonanza. I think the trees were loaded last year because of the drought and they just went into survival mode making bazillions of acorns. It has driven me crazy this year with all the sprouting trees. They are still sproutin out there and I can just squat in one spot and pull up dozens of them from my perennial beds. I don't look forward to another year of that! xo, suzy